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Rebuild Chimney
Why Install a Energy Saving Damper?
Rebuild Brick Risers & Reset Sand Stones
Reducing Creosote Buildup In Your Chimney
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North Coast Masonry Blog

Rebuild Chimney

Chimney Tuckpoint, Masonry Repair, Masonry Contractor






























Tear Down Existing Chimney And Rebuild With New Brick To Match Existing Chimney

Why Install a Energy Saving Damper?


Masonry, tuck-point, Steps, Foundation, Brick, Chimney










Why Install a Energy Saving Damper?

 
1) Warped, broken, or leaky throat dampers cost homeowners hundreds of dollars a year, and that figure is going nowhere but up. Independent laboratory tests show the Top-Sealing Damper eliminates as much as 90% of the air loss of a traditional damper. You can no longer afford a leaky throat damper with metal-to-metal contact like the one in your fireplace.
 
2) A Damper mounts easily atop a flue tile with silicone sealant. A 32' Stainless cable drops down the flue and mounts in the firebox. Chances are the energy-saving Damper will pay for itself in energy savings the first year.
 
3) Add a Damper Cap to your damper for added protection
against animals and spark control.
 
4) All Dampers come with a Lifetime Warranty.
 
Thank You,
North Coast Masonry

216-326-8174

Rebuild Brick Risers & Reset Sand Stones

Rebuild Brick Risers & Reset Sand Stones 

Before

Masonry, Chimney, Tuck-point, Tuckpoint, Foundation

After

Masonry, Chimney, Tuck-point, Tuckpoint, Foundation

Reducing Creosote Buildup In Your Chimney

Chimney, Tuckpoint, Chimney Repair, Building Restoration, Chimney Cap, Chimney Damper, Masonry Contractor, Porch, Steps, Foundation, Chimney Sweep







Reducing Creosote Buildup In Your Chimney
 
Restricted air supply, unseasoned wood and cooler than normal chimney temperatures can accelerate creosote buildup inside your chimney. To counteract creosote production, it is advisable to burn well-seasoned, dry wood that burns hotly and produces byproducts that exit the chimney quickly. Opening the damper fully and leaving fireplace doors open whenever possible increases air flow and dramatically decreases creosote buildup. The occasional burning of a chimney- cleaning log dislodges creosote and sends it harmlessly up and out of the chimney stack.
 
Thank You,
North Coast Masonry

216-326-8174

North Coast Masonry

Chimney, Tuckpoint, Tuck Point, Steps, Porch

Types of Firewood

Chimney Repair








Types of Firewood

Green vs. Seasoned
Green Firewood has moisture content greater than 50%. Any logs that have been cut down within 12 months should be considered green. A healthy standing tree will have a moisture content between 60% and 100+% (Yes, some trees can be more water than wood!). Thus green wood is any wood that has a moisture content of more than 50%, therefore making burning very ineffective because the potential BTU's (heat) of the wood will be lost in the release of the water through steam. The only true way to decrease the moisture content of wood is by opening the surface area of the wood to allow the water to evaporate via heat and air transfer. Firewood will not begin to fully season until split. You cannot completely season firewood in log or block form.Signs of green firewood include: very tight end grain, uniform wood color, heavy wood, intact bark, mold/fungus, strong smell, sap, bugs or a dull "thud" when pieces are banged together end to end.
Seasoned Firewood has moisture content less than 40% that will allow the wood to burn effectively and release the potential BTU's (heat). Wood that has been properly split and stored will promote the evaporation of water. In most areas of the country, especially the Northeast, it will take up to 12 months for split hardwood to be properly seasoned. Wood with more than 40% moisture content should not be burned for home heating. The minimum moisture content for optimal BTU's is no more than 20% to 30% moisture and as low as 10%. Below 10% the wood will burn too quickly. Signs of properly seasoned firewood include: checks (cracks) in the ends, loss of wood color, lighter wood, loss of bark, no signs of mold/fungus, lack of smell and a loud "clang" when banged together end to end (like a baseball bat).

Hardwoods vs. Softwoods
Hardwoods are very dense and they have more BTU's (= heat) per volume as compared to softwoods. They tend to be more difficult to start but will burn longer and release a good amount of heat. For all pratical purposes hardwoods are the best choice for firewood. Some hardwoods are better to burn than others. On Long Island we mainly burn Oak and Maple. They are excellent hardwoods for burning (as long as they're seasoned properly). Other quality burning hardwoods include: Ash, Beech, Birch and Hickory. There are other quality hardwoods but they are impractical to obtain in volume for firewood. Although most hardwoods do burn well there are a few that do not: Elm, Popular & Sycamore are among a few hardwoods that have poor burning characteristics.

Softwoods are less dense than hardwoods and tend to burn very quickly. They are good for starting a fire but will release a low amount of BTU's (= heat) per volume. Due to the high amount of sap in softwoods they are not recommended as indoor firewood. They may build up dangerous amount of Creosote in your chimney. If you do burn softwoods as firewood the following are the best choices: Doug Fir, Yellow Pine and Spruce. Most softwoods are best used as kindling and Cedar is among the best for that purpose. Cypress is among the worst softwood for firewood.

10 Questions To Ask When You’re Getting Your Chimney Cleaned

Masonry, Chimney, Tuck-point, Tuckpoint, Foundation






10 Questions To Ask When You’re Getting Your Chimney Cleaned

1. What will you do to clean the chimney?
Your chimney professional should be able to give you a step by step description of how he plans to clean your chimney and what he will do to protect your household during the cleaning process.
2. Is there just soot in the chimney or is there creosote, too?
Creosote is a highly flammable substance and its presence in your chimney can ignite causing a chimney fire. The presence of creosote in the chimney may indicate poor burning practices or a burning appliance that is not working well. In either case you should know of its presence, how the chimney professional will remove it, and what can be done to prevent or limit the presence of creosote in the chimney going forward. Soot on the other hand is a safe substance as long as it is removed before its accumulation interferes with draft. It is, in most cases, easily brushed away.
3. Can you inspect/clean other flues in my house besides the fireplace?
 Sometimes chimney professionals will give price breaks when more than one chimney or flue will be inspected/cleaned. If you’re having a chimney professional come to clean your fireplace flue, it’s probably a good idea to have them take a look at your furnace/water heater flues as well.
4. How long will it take?
Every flue is different, but on average a thorough cleaning should take about 25 minutes to 35 minutes. This time can increase substantially if there is creosote present in your flue, if the flue is damaged in any way, or if there are blockages such as birds’ nests. If your chimney cleaning requires more time it’s good to ask and understand why.
5. Do you inspect the chimney, too?
We recommend you have your flue inspected with each cleaning. A thorough inspection can alert you to possible unsafe conditions in your chimney.
6. How often should I have my chimney cleaned?
Your chimney professional can make a reasonable estimation for time between cleanings based on your individual burning practices.
7. How much do you charge?
Be sure to understand what you are getting for your money, i.e. inspection and cleaning, or just a cleaning.
8. Do you have Insurance?
Your chimney sweep company that you hire should provide you with a copy of their insurance papers before performing any work on your home.
9. How long have you been in business?
This is a good way to establish what level of experience your chimney professional has.
10. Will you have to go on the roof?
Some chimney pros clean from the top down, some clean from the bottom up. There is no one preferred method. In either case it’s good to know what their procedure will be.
 
Thank You,
North Coast Masonry

216-326-8174

Replace Chimney Flue Tiles And Chimney Wash

Chimney Flue Tiles, Chimney Wash, tuck point, Masonry, Brick, Foundation






Install New Chimney Flue Tiles And Chimney Wash

Tim Laurenzi in Avon, OH on Houzz

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Rebuild Wood Deck After Foundation Repair

Rebuild Wood Deck After Foundation Repair
















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